Croatia officially the Republic of Croatia, is a sovereign state at the crossroads of Central Europe, Southeast Europe, and the Mediterranean. Its capital city is Zagreb, which forms one of the country’s primary subdivisions, along with its twenty counties. Croatia covers 56,594 square kilometres (21,851 square miles) and has diverse, mostly continenta land Mediterranean climates. Croatia’s Adriatic Sea coast contains more than a thousand islands. The country’s population is 4.28 million, most of whom are Croats, with the most common religious denomination being Roman Catholicism.

The Croats arrived in the area of present-day Croatia during the early part of the 7th century AD. They organised the state into two duchies by the 9th century. Tomislav became the first king by 925, elevating Croatia to the status of a kingdom. The Kingdom of Croatia retained its sovereignty for nearly two centuries, reaching its peak during the rule ofKings Peter Krešimir IV and Dmitar Zvonimir. Croatia entered a personal union with Hungary in 1102. In 1527, faced with Ottoman conquest, the Croatian Parliament elected Ferdinand I of the House of Habsburg to the Croatian throne. In 1918, after World War I, Croatia was included in the unrecognized State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs which seceded from Austria-Hungary and merged into the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. The fascist Croatian puppet state backed by the Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany existed during World War II. After the war, Croatia became a founding member and a federal constituent of Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, a constitutionally socialist state. On 25 June 1991 Croatia declared independence, which came wholly into effect on 8 October of the same year. The Croatian War of Independence was fought successfully during the four years following the declaration.

HIGHLIGHTS

Zagreb The capital of Croatia, this 900 year old city is crowned by the 13th century gothic cathedral which, with its twin spires, is the city’s most impressive landmark. The cathedral is located in the historic Gronji Grad, or upper town which is a great place to wander or hang out in the many cafés. The quarter also contains the Church of St Marko with its brightly tiled roof.

 

 

Plitvice Lakes: Plitvicka Jezera, 16 interlinked lakes between Mala Kapela Mountain and Pljesevica Mountain in the region of Lika. The natural attributes of the Plitvice Lakes National Park, uniqueness and sensibility of that phenomenon, deserve a full attention of our visitors. Recreational aspect of stay and the amazement with beauty of the area that conquers by its natural diversity and harmony of shapes and colours in any of the seasons, is based on many mutually conditioned natural characteristics. UNESCO has declared it with all rights as the World’s natural inheritance.

 

Zadar is a Croatian city located between Rijeka and Split, not far away from Sibenik. It is a few thousand years old town and it was the capital of Dalmatia for many centuries. The Zadar peninsula still preserves very old network of narrow and charming city streets, as well as a Roman forum dating back to the first century AD. The pre-Romanesque Church of St. Donat dates back to the ninth century, and it is certainly Zadar’s most famous spot. Zadar is also well known for having the attractive Romanesque churches: Cathedral of St. Anastasia from 13th century and Church of St. Chrysogonus from 12th century as well as the church tower of St. Mary dating back from 12th century too.

 

According to the legend, Kornati, labyrinth of sea passages and islands, were created from the cliffs that God had left over after he had finished creation of the World. He threw them into the sea, turned around and concluded that no other repairs were necessary. The infamous George Bernard Shaw said of this group of the most indented islands of the Adriatic and the Mediterranean that consist of 140 islands, islets and reefs: ‘The Gods wanted to crown their work, so on the last day, from their tears, the stars and their breath they created Kornati – We believe no other description is necessary.

 

Trogir is a remarkable example of urban continuity. The orthogonal street plan of this island settlement dates back to the Hellenistic period and it was embellished by successive rulers with many fine public and domestic buildings and fortifications. Its beautiful Romanesque churches are complemented by the outstanding Renaissance and Baroque buildings from the Venetian period. On 1997 UNESCO inscribes Trogir on the World heritage List.

 

 

Split is not only an urban, cultural and traffic centre of Dalmatia with road and sea connections to Dalmatia’s numerous summer resorts, but it is itself often a tourist and excursionists destination. A city with a 1700-year old tradition, a variety of archaeological, historical and cultural monuments, among which the well-known Palace of Diocletian, inscribed into the UNESCO World Heritage List, certainly occupies a special position, and the warmth and offer of a modern Mediterranean city.

 

 

Dubrovnik – the city of a unique political and cultural history (the Dubrovnik Republic, the Statute from 1272), of world-famous cultural heritage and beauty (inscribed on the List of World Heritage Sites by UNESCO) – is one of the most attractive and famous cities of the Mediterranean. Apart from its outstanding natural beauties and well-preserved cultural and historical heritage, Dubrovnik also offers high-quality visitor opportunities.

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